Vote early in person

You can vote early with an absentee ballot at your local elections office. If you are not registered, you can do so in person if you show proof of residence.

Locations

For most elections, you can vote in person at your county election office. Some cities and towns are offering in-person absentee voting for the 2016 primary and general elections.

Hours

For most elections, absentee voting locations must be open during their normal business hours starting 46 days before the election. In addition, locations offering absentee ballots for federal, state or county elections must be open:

  • The last Saturday before Election Day (10 a.m. — 3 p.m.)
  • The day before Election Day until 5 p.m.
  • This does not apply to school districts holding standalone elections.

Some local jurisdictions may provide additional absentee voting days or hours beyond the above required days and times. Call your jurisdiction for more information.

2016 Dates

GENERAL ELECTION

First day to vote early in person  Friday, September 23
Last day to vote early in person Monday, November 7

Have an agent pick up your ballot (agent delivery)

In special situations, you may ask an agent to pick up and return an absentee ballot for you. This is called ‘agent delivery.’

To qualify for agent delivery, you must live in a:

  • nursing home
  • assisted living facility
  • residential treatment center
  • group home
  • battered women’s shelter
  • or, be hospitalized or unable to go to the polling place due to incapacitating health reasons or a disability.
  • Your agent must be at least 18 years old, have a pre-existing relationship with you and cannot be a candidate. An individual cannot be an agent of more than three voters in an election.

Give your agent a completed absentee ballot application and a request for agent delivery of absentee ballot form. Have your agent take both forms to the local election office to receive your ballot.

Your agent can pick up your ballot starting seven days before the election until 2 p.m. on Election Day. Your agent or someone else you designate must return your ballot by 3 p.m. on Election Day. You can also return your ballot by mail. Election officials must receive your ballot on or before Election Day.

Office Of The Minnesota Secretary Of State, Steve Simon

http://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting/other-ways-to-vote/vote-early-in-person/

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Divided We Fall

The political expedient of offering a free lunch leads government authorities to make commitments they cannot support in the long term without assessments and tax increases–both political suicide. The get hit in their campaign funds and hit at the polls. The American wealthiest and their corporate empires assume a 19th century uber-privilege, owing nothing to the societies that fed their greed and freely buying the politicians to insure that. American voters meanwhile have been convinced that they deserve to have the amenities but not pay for them.

Then, when the bills come in, the authorities, beholden to their wealthy benefactors, look for excuses and scapegoats rather than biting the bullet, correcting tax law, and convincing tax-payers to pay up or give up the things they’ve come to expect. So the result is that they go after two of their own big expenses–the public workers, who make our society civilized, and the neediest, who don’t pay much tax and often don’t vote. Breaking the life-long promise of a pension to public employees, cutting funding to schools, and reducing the public work force, government chews off its own leg to free itself from the trap of its own design. Cutting off the needy is simply barbaric.

America has been effectively marketed a dream that everyone deserves a life that is fun and feels good. Watch almost any TV ad. Americans are discouraged from thinking about how that could be true when we know that life includes effort and pain. Only when enough of us look around and think will we begin to reverse the seemingly inexorable trend toward a country of 350,000,000 individuals, each at the center of her or his own universe, and start to reestablish America as a united society, who share common needs despite individual differences. If “divided we fall” has not been apparent before, certainly watching the human pieces of our civil society fall away over the years should alert us to the future we will leave our children and grandchildren.

Every thoughtful person must stand up, speak out, help out and vote.